education & tech

mLearning, teacher, scholar, social media

Education + Tech

Education & Tech, was created to build hope that education based on social technologies, can transform the new century, and enable abundance not only spiritually but economically. Milton Ramirez, Ed.D. - @tonnet is the founder & editor. He is a teacher, tech blogger, writes on education, and hails this blog from Union, NJ. For further questions, tips or concerns please e-mail him to:miltonramirez [at] educationandtech [dot] com

Teacher + Scholar

If you are a regular to Blog Education & Tech, you shall remember that I am a blogger and I'd written a post about education almost everyday since 2003. Education & Tech provides you with education news, expert tech advice, classroom management ideas, and social media tools for educators, administrators, parents and k-12 students.

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Oxford Debate at NECC 2009



We are so close to the NECC 2009, Washington DC, June 28 -July 1, 2009. There is a topic for the Oxford debate at NECC 2009 under the theme Bricks and Mortar Schools are Detrimental to the Future of Education.

They are receipting questions for this debate. You can also summit yours, after proper registration. Click here to join in. The following are the top 7 questions so far:

1. How would losing the physical meeting place affect those coming from unstable home environments?

2. What will the end brick and mortar schools mean for the socialization of students?

3. How might a shift to online education affect the current and future workforce of teachers?

4. Is pounding down the ‘brick and mortar’ the only way to change instruction or pedagogical practices?

5. Why not expand school services and school day, incorporating education into the fabric of life?

6. How are you going to motivate those students than don't do anything on their own?

7. Is face to face interaction completely dead?

The order eventually may change because we are still one week away from the National Education Computing Conference 2009.

Update [06/26/09]

As we believed the order has changed and there is a huge amount of questions to be addressed right now:

a.(3) How might a shift to online education affect the current and future workforce of teachers?

b. (2) Rremains in the 2nd position.

c. (6) How are you going to motivate those students than don't do anything on their own?

d. How would losing the physical meeting place affect those coming from unstable home environments? (This is a new question ranked high)

e.(5) Why not expand school services and school day, incorporating education into the fabric of life.

f.(4) Is pounding down the ‘brick and mortar’ the only way to change instruction or pedagogical practices?

g. Does online education meet the needs for all considering many ages, abilities, and learning styles? (Completely new)

The other three mos prominent questions are:

- Rethinking the traditional desk, what adaptations might make the workstation relevant in the future?
- After #IranElection, Twitter, & US State Dept situation: Are social media blocks being reconsidered?
- In what ways can we make technology accessible for all students, regardless of socioeconomic status?

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CEP: NCLB Focus on Proficiency Is Shortchanging Students

CEP (Center on Education Policy) has released an analysis to answer: Is the Emphasis on “Proficiency”Shortchanging Higher- and Lower-Achieving Students? (pdf doc). The study shows good news for the NCLB (No Child Left Behind) policy.

Sean Cavanagh of Education Week is among the few who picked the study and states the following:

The 50-state analysis found that test scores for both "advanced" and "basic" students rose in nearly three-quarters of assessments studied across states and grade levels, a level of progress only slightly lower than that of students reaching proficiency.

The study sought to examine a story line put forward in recent years—namely, that schools are not focusing on the highest- or lowest-scoring students, but rather on middle achievers, said Jack Jennings, the president of the Center on Education Policy, which produced the report.

While the progress of high and low achievers could be stagnating in individual instances or schools, the study indicates that on average, those students are advancing...

On the other hand, Andrew Rotherham asks: 'Is it too cynical to think it would be bigger news if it went the other way?' Rotherham wrote an entry at eduwonk.com to comment why so few had taken on the news today.

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Americans Students Are Underworked

It is not a statement we can sustain because we do know that is only half true. Statistics not always supports evidently an argument. This is the case for The Economist. They subscribe to the idea that American students are underworked and compare hours class with those from Germany, Paris and Asia.

They suggest students are not paired with those in other countries because they do not attend full round year of school. But forgo to mention American students are underchallenged, it is not because they aren’t spending enough time in school!

They also suggest that these three months off in Summer act like a "mental eraser, with the average child reportedly forgetting about a month’s-worth of instruction in many subjects and almost three times that in mathematics.” Even whether these same students attend summer school or go for remedial classes, they will forget what they learn in the last 30 days!

It is heard a lot that Asian school are the super model, speaking of school success. Lets read what a Korean under the name of ME commented at Joanne Jacobs blog, about this article:

    The article conveniently neglects to mention that suicide is one of the highest causes of death for children in South Korea. It’s not unheard of for teens to kill themselves if they don’t measure up academically. I think the same is true for Japan. SK even has a curious saying re: studying for exams: 'Sleep four hours and pass, sleep five hours and fail.' Perhaps American children do need to work harder, but I’m not sure we should be looking to a country that runs its children *that* ragged is very smart.

    My parents (who seemed like unreasonable hardasses to me as a kid — they had the audacity to make me to go SUMMER SCHOOL! *gasp*) left South Korea because they did not like the education system, and they thought the amount of stress that Korean society places on its children with respect to school was too much. And my parents do indeed care about academics; even now, they keep telling me to go on to grad school. :P But at some point, the other extreme becomes just as bad. American slackdom should not be encouraged, but neither should the South Korean GET-HIGH-GRADES-DANGIT-OR-ELSE-YOU’RE-A-MISERABLE FAILURE-dom.

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How Technology is Transforming Public Schools

Interesting how Hon. George Miller and The House Education and Labor Committee will be holding a hearing tomorrow, Tuesday, June 16 to examine how technology and innovative education tools are transforming and improving education in America.

Full Committee Hearing at 10:00 AM, June 16, 2009 2175 Rayburn H.O.B Washington, DC

Witnesses include school district technology officers, industry leaders, and a middle-school science teacher. For more information, or to view streaming video of the hearing, visit the Education & Labor committee website.

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