education & tech

mLearning, teacher, scholar, social media

Education + Tech

Education & Tech, was created to build hope that education based on social technologies, can transform the new century, and enable abundance not only spiritually but economically. Milton Ramirez, Ed.D. - @tonnet is the founder & editor. He is a teacher, tech blogger, writes on education, and hails this blog from Union, NJ. For further questions, tips or concerns please e-mail him to:miltonramirez [at] educationandtech [dot] com

Teacher + Scholar

If you are a regular to Blog Education & Tech, you shall remember that I am a blogger and I'd written a post about education almost everyday since 2003. Education & Tech provides you with education news, expert tech advice, classroom management ideas, and social media tools for educators, administrators, parents and k-12 students.

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Write Good English Following These 12 Rules

There is no question that writing shows how educated you are, but learning the mechanics is another story. I have to accept that I fail to proof read my posts before they are uploaded, for some reason I switch the order in the typed letters (typographical errors) and I frequently forgot I am writing, and input the same colloquial expressions as I usually talk.

Learning with'e's suggests we should begin to look over the rules of the English language. What we must enforce? We have to get grammar right, "steering clear of repetition and avoiding all the avoidable little syntax errors you could of avoided."

Writing good English means you have to:

(Quote)

1. Verbs has to agree with their subjects.
2. Prepositions are not words to end sentences with.
3. And don't start a sentence with a conjunction.
4. It is wrong to ever split an infinitive.
5. Avoid cliches like the plague. (They are old hat)
6. Be more or less specific.
8. Parenthetical remarks (however relevant) are (usually) unnecessary.
9. Also, too, never, ever use repetitive redundancies.
10. No sentence fragments.
11. Don't use no double negatives.
12. Proofread carefully to see if you any words out.

Be my guest.

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Students Could End Up Upside Down With Their College Education

Alex Reid comments on an article by Michael Feldstein. The Product Manager for Academic Enterprise Solutions asks whether there is a bubble in the higher education market. He points, writes Reid, to a number of statistics indicating the declining rate of return for a college student investing in his or her education. "Unlike your home, your education is a fundamentally illiquid asset. You can’t sell off your diploma, even at a loss, to pay back your bank loans. These students will be screwed six ways from Sunday, which is even more ways than they’re getting screwed now," cites A. Reid.

Students could end up essentially upside down in a college education that will never be worth the cost.

Here are three more thoughts the author of Digital Dids, has on that.
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In Defense of Public School Teachers in a Time of Crisis

There has been a long, though declining, tradition in the United States in which public school teaching was embraced as an important public service. It was assumed that teachers provided a crucial foundation for educating young people in the values, skills and knowledge that enabled them to be critical citizens capable of shaping and expanding democratic institutions. Since the 1980s, teachers have been under an unprecedented attack by those forces that view schools less as a public good than as a private right. Seldom accorded the status of intellectuals that they deserved, they remain the most important component in the learning process for students, while serving as a moral compass to gauge how seriously a society invests in its youth and in the future. Yet, teachers are being deskilled, unceremoniously removed from the process of school governance, largely reduced to technicians or subordinated to the authority of security guards. Underlying these transformations are a number of forces eager to privatize schools, substitute vocational training for education and reduce teaching and learning to reductive modes of testing and evaluation.

This is only the first paragraph Maggie on The Freire Project, posted back on April 14, 2010.

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Why hasn't education community accepted the idea of acceleration?

Education Research Report:

America's schools routinely avoid academic acceleration, the easiest and most effective way to help highly capable students. While the popular perception is that a child who skips a grade will be socially stunted, fifty years of research shows that moving bright students ahead often makes them happy.

Acceleration means moving through the traditional curriculum at rates faster than typical. The 18 forms of acceleration include grade-skipping, early-entrance to school, and Advanced Placement (AP) courses. It is appropriate educational planning. It means matching the level and complexity of the curriculum with the readiness and motivation of the student.

To find out what are the reasons A Nation Deceived presents and to which Jonathan Kantrowitz disagres, visit the original post here.

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