education & tech

mLearning, teacher, scholar, social media

Education + Tech

Education & Tech, was created to build hope that education based on social technologies, can transform the new century, and enable abundance not only spiritually but economically. Milton Ramirez, Ed.D. - @tonnet is the founder & editor. He is a teacher, tech blogger, writes on education, and hails this blog from Union, NJ. For further questions, tips or concerns please e-mail him to:miltonramirez [at] educationandtech [dot] com

Teacher + Scholar

If you are a regular to Blog Education & Tech, you shall remember that I am a blogger and I'd written a post about education almost everyday since 2003. Education & Tech provides you with education news, expert tech advice, classroom management ideas, and social media tools for educators, administrators, parents and k-12 students.

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Speed Up Your Web Surfing With These Twitter Keyboard Shortcuts in the #newtwitter

Yesterday in the morning when I decided to log in on my Twitter account, the first notification that noticed was the option to try its new version. As any new user, I started to browse around and there are two things I already dislike: Half of the window is now used to show up your time line. I don't feel comfortable at all, it seems like somebody is pushing you aside when they have plenty of space. And the second, the time consuming new way to thank for RTs. Before, you could stack up all names giving you a RT, and reply in a shot, right now it is simply impossible.

That said, there is a bunch of things that I also like. The mini biographies of each tweeter, the possibility of retweet a Follow Friday very easily, the conversation threads and the smarter suggestions to people I should follow.

But it is the new look in general that struck me. As @drewb points out, it feels more like Gmail or Tweetdeck than a stream of updates. There is also the keyboard shortcuts navigation, sort of Google Reader, which makes it a delight for the geek community.

Enjoy the speedier surfing with these pro keyboard shortcuts for the new Twitter:

1. J - moves the highlighted tweet down one tweet
2. K - moves up a tweet
3. Space - moves screen down
4. Shift-Space - moves screen up
5. Shift H - top of screen
6. Shift R - replies to the tweet you're hovering over
7. Shift F - favorites the tweet you're hovering over
8. Shift T - retwets the tweet you're hovering over
9. Enter - opens tweet to the right hand panel
10. F - favorites that tweet (star)
11. R - replies to that tweet
12. T - retweets that tweet
13. Enter again - closes opened tweet
14. M - opens 'Message' in a pop-up window
15. Esc - closes 'Message' pop-up window
16. N - opens new tweet in pop-up window (Esc closes again)
17. / - goes to search
18. Shift H - goes to home
19. . - refreshes tweets
20. g then m - go to inbox
21. g then r - go to replies
22. g then f - go to favourites
23. g then p - go to your profile
24. g then u - go to a person's profile
25. g then h - go to home

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10 Things I Wish Someone Had Told Me When I Started Teaching.

I have been teaching for many year and this list really struck me. It was aimed to new teachers but after you read the list you will accept all that description applies to you, too.

Every teacher has a wide range of experiences during his/her career , this compendium will refresh your memory, if does not help you in the classroom.

We would love to copy the whole text but Miss Brave hasn't liberated her contents under Creative Commons, yet. So in place, I'll transfer, at least the main ideas.

The following are the 10 Things Every Teacher Must Remember:

1. Don't sweat the small stuff - First week of classes is a mess.

2. If you can put off until tomorrow what you planned on doing today...you might want to think about it - Do your school stuff and then think of YOURSELF.

3. You can only plan what you can plan - Planning doesn't have to be a wreck.

4. There is no such thing as empty time - Even when you have it, use it to your own benefit.

5. Be prepared for anything. Really: anything - Do not pay us for do everything, but we have to.

6. Improvise - Have you ever made a mistake? You know how to get out of it.

7. Use resources from your sources - Is not always bad to overlook what your colleagues are doing.

8. Never assume. Speak up! - It never hurts to ask. Make sure all parties understand the point.

9. Some days, you have to be brave and hold your own hand - Loneliness may play against every teacher, but you still have family and friends.

10. Your moment will come to you - The best reform ever, cannot give a path for success. You are always in charge.

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Computer Use Does Not Hurt a Child's Academic Performance

The Washington Post:

It looks like the kids are alright, after all. A new study from the University of Maryland shows that more time spent in front of a computer doesn't hurt a child's academic performance, and, in some cases, actually improves test scores. Led by family science professor Sandra L. Hofferth, the six-year study followed a group of 1,000 children, who were between the ages of six and 12 in 1997, and continued through 2003. As the students spent more time on computers, their test scores didn't suffer significantly, even if they spent most of their time playing games on their PCs.

Read the original article written by Donna St. George

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Be Precise About What the Problems in American Education Really Are.

A lengthy article completely worth reading if you happen to be among those crying for and education reform in the American system. From The New Yorker:

...By the fundamental test of attractiveness to students and their families, the system—which is one of the world’s most ethnically diverse and decentralized—is, as a whole, succeeding. Enrollment in charter schools is growing rapidly, but so is enrollment in old-fashioned public schools, and enrollments are rising at all levels. Those who complete a higher education still do better economically. Measures of how much American students are learning—compared to the past, and compared to students in other countries—are holding steady, for the most part, even as more people are going to school.

Amen!

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Laughs Are Good, Not So Schooliness And Blackboards

I wish every teacher who evangelize about social media and self-publishing has an opening paragraph like Clay Burell did in this blog post.

How the teacher is to avoid, at all costs, schooliness and focus on success of learning. The teacher does not have to present the contents under their own name, his creativity will go beyond the literal description of the matter of a determined subject. For some this is was called motivation while in college education, for Burell it is a plain belly-laugh:

    ...The sooner students learn that laughter is okay when they’re presenting, the sooner they ascend from boring to interesting, from droning automaton to spirited human being. And maybe, just maybe, that discovery leads them to learn that designing and giving a presentation can be one of life’s highest pleasures.

The thesis is supported by two videos: Why Hores Are so Great and How to Teach Presentation Zen in Eight Minutes.

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