education & tech

mLearning, teacher, scholar, social media

Education + Tech

Education & Tech, was created to build hope that education based on social technologies, can transform the new century, and enable abundance not only spiritually but economically. Milton Ramirez, Ed.D. - @tonnet is the founder & editor. He is a teacher, tech blogger, writes on education, and hails this blog from Union, NJ. For further questions, tips or concerns please e-mail him to:miltonramirez [at] educationandtech [dot] com

Teacher + Scholar

If you are a regular to Blog Education & Tech, you shall remember that I am a blogger and I'd written a post about education almost everyday since 2003. Education & Tech provides you with education news, expert tech advice, classroom management ideas, and social media tools for educators, administrators, parents and k-12 students.

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Is Texting Ruining the Writing of Our Students?

The Reading Workshop:

Some teachers feel that the slang, or casual language used extensively in texting and IM'ing will have detrimental long term effects. Most seem to ignore the fact that kids today are writing constantly. In fact, putting thoughts into written words is part of the natural lives of kids today. Anyone who cannot share their thoughts through texting is at risk of becoming a social outcast.

Students don't see the constant use of slang as a problem. They know the difference between casual language between friends and formal language used in school and business. According to Pew Internet's Teen Writing Survey, 83% of students feel there is a greater need to be able to write well in order to be successful now when compared to twenty years ago. They also found that 85% of students write in school at least several times each week.

Another worry, especially at the secondary and collegiate level is how students spend class time texting instead of focusing on the lesson being taught. However, forward thinking instructors have begun to use this to their advantage by engaging students in real-time dialogue and assessment.

Read the whole article by Jim Mcguire at The Reading Workshop.

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Using Cellphones When They Are Not in All Students' Hand

We have written many times about banning cellphones in the classroom. But there is the case where teachers had endured the no-no approach from many other colleagues in school.

Cellphones, indeed are an effective learning tools if you know how to incorporate them in the curriculum. Mobile learning comes just in hand with the crescent use of gadgets and gizmos nowadays. If we, as teachers, are unable to handle learning in this environment is not students fault. It is our responsibility.

Lisa Nielsen in her The Innovative Educator writes about 7 ideas to work in a classroom where not all students happen to carry out a cellphone.

Of course, if you already are giving a break to heavy users of SMS and all mobile learning gadgets, feel free to contribute to the list:

    1. Checking out a device from school i.e. laptop, iTouch, cell phone
    2. Connecting with community businesses willing to provide students with afterschool access to technology.
    3. Connecting students with mentors who could ensure students had access to technology.
    4. Partnerships with local library.
    5. Outreach to cell phone providers to donate minutes/equipment for students in need.
    6. Setting a place in the school (i.e. library, lab, classroom) for after school/ before school access to school technology.
    7. Partnering classmates who can share technology.

We are still on time to learn from so populated nations like China.

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