education & tech

mLearning, teacher, scholar, social media

Education + Tech

Education & Tech, was created to build hope that education based on social technologies, can transform the new century, and enable abundance not only spiritually but economically. Milton Ramirez, Ed.D. - @tonnet is the founder & editor. He is a teacher, tech blogger, writes on education, and hails this blog from Union, NJ. For further questions, tips or concerns please e-mail him to:miltonramirez [at] educationandtech [dot] com

Teacher + Scholar

If you are a regular to Blog Education & Tech, you shall remember that I am a blogger and I'd written a post about education almost everyday since 2003. Education & Tech provides you with education news, expert tech advice, classroom management ideas, and social media tools for educators, administrators, parents and k-12 students.

Welcome Twitterer! Why not like our site for more updates?

Education & Tech: News for Educators 10/13/2016

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

American teachers unable to buy their own house!

An article in the PBS NewsHour has sparked controversy on the Internet whether teachers really are paid enough (or even well paid) as to afford their own houses. Community argue teachers are living well because they only work for 9 months during the year, opposite to what everyone else is working in the U.S. Some others differ:

Most teachers earn much less than $57K, says Rodrigo Fernandez, a Chilean in Austin, Texas. They have to work more than 40 hours a week, spend their own money in educational materials, and have children of their own, and they have the responsibility of preparing most of your children for the future.

However, teachers are not so much different than some other Americans. In order to get your own house, the stream of two incomes is necessary in any middle class family. That is precisely what Fawn Neun, a Chief Editor and Hair Puller at Vagabondage Press, in Florida, wrote in Facebok. "I know a lot of people that would love to have a $56k a year salary who have similar qualifications and professional standing as most public school teachers. Housing frequently requires two incomes for everyone in the middle class now."

Mel Gee is another of the participants in the discussion. This person relies on statistics to back up the argument that teachers are well off as of now. US Median Income across all professions is $51,939. So many Americans can't afford to buy a house. At least teachers have a retirement fund, affordable healthcare, and union protection. Gee asserts she's a "pro-teacher" so she's not against them having these things. She just thinks we all should.

And of course we have interpretations pointing to the political parties. Keith Sottung from Holland, Pennsylvania, declares: "The GOP has made it very clear teachers are an expense obstacle towards a profitable business. Do get me started on how they feel about unionized teachers."

The study by the National Housing Conference, Paycheck to Paycheck - A Snapshot of House Affordability for School Workers to which the PBS NewsHour refers to is here.

Want to add to this story? Let us know in comments, subscribe in a reader or send an email to the author at miltonramirez@educationandtech.com . You can share ideas for stories on the Education & Tech.

Milton Ramirez

Education & Tech: News for Educators 09/28/2016

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Education & Tech: News for Educators

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Education & Tech: News for Educators

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Nuances of Written English Not Taught in School

Grammar nuances
By Lucy Adams*

Undoubtedly, the English language is one of the most powerful business tools. The international language significantly expands your opportunities. The better you English, the more credible you are in the business world.

Well, all starts from school. Regardless of you are Englishmen, American or non-native, you've studied English under a standard program. Alas, but it sometimes misses the important things like specific grammatical constructions, the arrangement of commas, etc.

Let's have a look at the nuances of written English not taught in school. Looking ahead, I must say that in case of significant problems with English, you may always order an essay help at special services like Undoubtedly, the English language is one of the most powerful business tools. The international language significantly expands your opportunities. The better you English, the more credible you are in the business world.

Well, all starts from school. Regardless of you are Englishmen, American or non-native, you’ve studied English under a standard program. Alas, but it sometimes misses the important things like specific grammatical constructions, the arrangement of commas, etc. Let’s have a look at the nuances of written English not taught in school. Looking ahead, I must say that in case of significant problems with English, you may always order an essay help at special services like bestessay4you

#1 Inversion

The translators of fiction say that to provide an accurate translation, they almost every time have to restructure English sentences and then build a new one in the target language not to lose the meaning. That's why because English grammar has a very strict word order. However, the inversion is quite typical:

  • There is a cake on the table (there is/there are).
  • "This is your pill," – said the doctor (after the direct speech).
  • "Here is your money, please" (in sentences that begin with "here").
  • Had I played better, I would win the competition (in conditional sentences with the verbs was/were/could/should).
  • Never had I had such a terrible support (in complex sentences that begin with the words no sooner/not only/scarcely/hardly/nothing/never).
  • It was me who won the fight against corruption (as part of a turn it is / was… that / who / whom).
#2 Comma Before "Which/That"

Among the types of subordinate clauses in English, there are ones that begin with recognizable relative pronouns who/whom/that/which/whose/when/where. The attributive clause can be restrictive and nonrestrictive. The first reduces all possible characteristics of a noun to a single and the most important one while the second simply states one of the many properties of an object or subject:

  • 1. I met with a girl who was smoking a long cigarette. It was Mary (restrictive clause).
  • 2. I met with a girl who was smoking a long cigarette, which looked expensive (nonrestrictive clause).
Why know all this? Just because nonrestrictive clause requires comma while restrictive doesn't.

Most often, "which" indicates nonrestrictive clause while "that" – restrictive one. The latter often requires a comma.

#3 Absolute Phrase

One of the mistakes that can be made in the process of learning English is trying to understand the English grammar on the base of the grammar of the native language. Although almost every language has logics, these logics are often very different.

To sound authentic, you need to get used to using English grammatical forms like Absolute Phrase. (by the way, "phrase" is called a structure in which there's no subject and predicate; "clause" is a subordinated sentence; "sentence" is a separate simple or complex sentence).

Absolute Phrase can't be translated literally! Let's take an example:

  • With his hand on the table, Jane waited for the beginning of the lesson.
Absolute turnover must contain at least a noun and a participle. It can be constructed on the basis of one Present Participle (-ing) or Past Participle (-ed). Absolute turnover is particularly useful when the author describes an object or situation that he's watching closely.

#4 Verb as a Subject

A verb can be a subject not just in the gerund form (signing), but also in the form of the infinitive (to sing). In contrary to the school instincts that may prompt us to always use the gerund, it is worth remembering that the English grammar allows the second option:

  • To sing this song has always been Lucy’s dream, although she has been born in a city where there are no great vocal tutors.
#5 Semicolon

Semicolon plays a major role in English punctuation. Not by chance, this sign is put on one of the most convenient places on the keyboard. To understand whether you can use a semicolon, it is often enough to ask yourself whether you can put a point instead, thereby dividing the sentence into two separate fragments.

  • I saw a pigeon flying in the sky; it was Harry, my favorite bird.
#6 Direct Speech and Punctuation

Unlike other languages, English doesn't require a colon or a dash in front of or after the direct speech.

  • "It was fantastic."
The final punctuation mark in a replica – regardless it is an interrogation point, an exclamation point or a dot – is put before the quotation marks.

#7 Oxford Comma

Oxford comma (Harvard comma) is a comma that can be placed right before the third item in the enumeration.

  • I went down the street, bought a ticket, and returned home, but still was disappointed.
Despite its name, Oxford comma is more typical for the American English.

Oxford Comma. Photo by Topher McCulloch on Flickr
Being a non-native speaker among natives is sometimes challenging. The fewer mistakes you make, the more credible you look in the eyes of English pen wizards. Feel free to share your tips for learning English in comments.

(*) Lucy is a professional writer from http://www.edublogawards.org. The blogger is always in touch with her readers and ready to answer any of your questions. Moreover, Lucy writes blogs for free! Thus, you have a unique chance to add some value to your website without investing a single penny. Contact the blogger and get a fast response.



Education & Tech
Related Posts with Thumbnails
 
Copyright © 2016 Milton Ramirez, Blogger, Teacher, Writer - . Powered by Blogger.