education & tech

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Education + Tech

Education & Tech, was created to build hope that education based on social technologies, can transform the new century, and enable abundance not only spiritually but economically. Milton Ramirez, Ed.D. - @tonnet is the founder & editor. He is a teacher, tech blogger, writes on education, and hails this blog from Union, NJ. For further questions, tips or concerns please e-mail him to:miltonramirez [at] educationandtech [dot] com

Teacher + Scholar

If you are a regular to Blog Education & Tech, you shall remember that I am a blogger and I'd written a post about education almost everyday since 2003. Education & Tech provides you with education news, expert tech advice, classroom management ideas, and social media tools for educators, administrators, parents and k-12 students.

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Social Web in Education and Good Use of Technology

Once cellphones are in the hands of the rebel, pupils can start using technology for the right things, and with direction they would stop using it for the wrong things

There is an ongoing investigation performed by an aspiring EdD that is part of the edonis project (Educator Online Impact Study). David Noble is the author of his thesis: How are educators using the social web to develop their practice? This three year project hopes to gather about 100 educators together in an online community to discuss issues, complete questionnaires and respond to questions on their use of the social web.

The study it's been performed in England and some others like Steven Hastings are also contributing to social web in education. Unfortunately, there in UK as much as here in the US, Some teachers are on top of technology but too many are not. Colleagues still feel afraid or discouraged of knowing less or nothing respect of their students. We have to hand credit to the students here, they've been born in a different age and of course they had the opportunity to learn quickly topics that for us, took it a long time.

Will of great interest to read the conclusions of David Noble to learn (yes, we all are learning everyday, even from our youngest student), and compare what we are doing in the States. We do have to accept that schools are in need to bridge the digital divide. And as Hastings put it in his article published at tes.co.uk, "This generation gap can easily leave teachers feeling bewildered and intimidated. Knowing your pupils understand the latest technologies better than you do can be daunting. The trick may be to hold on tight and go with the flow, letting pupils show you what the latest gadgets can do, and then using your educational expertise to find the classroom potential in it."

I'm still not convinced whether we have enough reasons to ban the use of cellphones. These instruments or gadgets as ICTs would like to name them are in the pockets of almost everyone in the developed countries. Why can they use them for good in class, because once you banned them what you asking is from a breaking of the rules, and kids are just learning to cheat that is something we eagerly want to eradicate.

In the same article written by Steven Hastings he relates an experience from students at King James’s School in Knaresborough. When they were talking about a subject topic, even shy students were typing on cellphones their opinions and answers, which on time appeared of a big screen for all students to read.

I think we all teachers need to think it out again!

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Post a Comment

  1. latoyagreen said...
     

    I love this article! I feel the same way about forbiding certain technologies within the classroom. I know that if not supervised properly, more popular technology can be abused; but the same applies for computer usage. My students develop a monthly newspaper and they get to choose their own topics. One article spoke of how ipods, cellphones, etc. can be good for education. If we gave them a chance to share what they already know then they could possibly teach us a thing or two. Personally, I'm willing to learn!

  2. TonNet said...
     

    I don't know about you, but in our case, we learn everyday from those young brilliant minds, even from students who are entitled as hard timers.

    If you allow them to talk about what they like and what they know, the outcomes are really significant. Keep doing what you've started to do. Good luck!

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