education & tech

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Education + Tech

Education & Tech, was created to build hope that education based on social technologies, can transform the new century, and enable abundance not only spiritually but economically. Milton Ramirez, Ed.D. - @tonnet is the founder & editor. He is a teacher, tech blogger, writes on education, and hails this blog from Union, NJ. For further questions, tips or concerns please e-mail him to:miltonramirez [at] educationandtech [dot] com

Teacher + Scholar

If you are a regular to Blog Education & Tech, you shall remember that I am a blogger and I'd written a post about education almost everyday since 2003. Education & Tech provides you with education news, expert tech advice, classroom management ideas, and social media tools for educators, administrators, parents and k-12 students.

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A Modeling Method to Improve Behaviour in the Classroom

Management of classroom is by far the most intricate activity when you are a teacher in the lower levels. By experience I can say that the one thing you need is knowledge and patience. But what do you do when when you have a group of students that either disrupt your class or simply don't want to do their work?

Some colleagues will call for motivation. We call it an strategy. Michael Linsin comes with an interesting proposal we think is helpful and might solve a problem for many of us, k-12 teachers. This modeling method receives the name of Power of One

How the Power of One works.



After giving directions for whatever it is you want your students to do, follow these five steps, writes Linsin at Smart Classroom Management:

    1. Pause. A pause creates anticipation, drawing more attention to you and interest in whatever comes next.

    2. Choose one. Choose one student to do whatever it is you want your entire class to do. Who you choose only matters in that it must be someone you’re confident will perform the task correctly.

    3. Student performs. Don’t say a word while the chosen student is performing the task. When the student finishes, be sure to offer a small gesture of praise.

    4. Allow for questions. Allow questions if there is any. Then ask if there is anyone who, for any reason, will not be able to perform the task as modeled.

    5. The rest of the class performs. Ask for repetition. The rest of your students will then perform the task exactly how you want.

This strategy well may be called micromanaging for the time and space it takes, but definitely you will exercise control on a determined student and the task can be performed by any ordinary student, so the rest of the class would love to reflect on him.

What kind of resource of strategy are you going to use this new year with your disruptive students?

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